Interactive Diagram

Continous Ridge Vent

Light Transmitting Panel

"PBR" Panel

Tape Sealer

Purlin

Eave Trim

Sliding Glass Window

Cast-In-Place Base

Sculptured Eave Gutter

Base Angle

Sidewall Girt

Eave Strut

Downspout W/45 degree angle

Corner Trim

Sculptured Rake

Rake Angle

Roll-Up Door

Door Jam Trim

Peak Box

Ridge Cap

Continous Ridge Vent

A type of vent installed at the peak of a sloped roof which allows warm, humid air to escape a building's attic.

Light Transmitting Panel

A plastic roof panel installed to admit light. The acrylic modified, UV stabilized, light transmitting panels are high strength translucent panels that are made of glass fiber reinforced polyester.

"PBR" Panel

A metal panel attached to the inside flange of the girts or the purlins. The panel is used when it is desirable to protect the field installed insulation and improve inside appearance.

Tape Sealer

Sealant used to join two panels to prevent water or anything else from pentrating through.

Purlin

A horizontal structural member bridging two or more rafters of a roof. They support the loads from the roof deck or sheathing and are supported by the principal rafters and/or the building walls. Purlin members are frequently constructed from cold-formed steel 'Z' sections. Pictured above is a purlin to rafter with a flange brace.

Eave Trim

Trim used to close off top of sidewall panels instead of eave gutter.

Sliding Glass Window

Has two or more sashes that overlap slightly but slide horizontally within the frame.

Cast-In-Place Base

A base attached to the forms prior to pouring concrete that is used to secure the foundation to support wall panels.

Sculptured Eave Gutter

The trough that channels water from the eaves to the downspouts.

Base Angle

A continuous angle secured to foundation to support wall panels.

Sidewall Girt

Horizontal structural member in a framed wall. They resist lateral loads from wind and support wall cladding materials. Girts are frequently constructed from cold-formed steel 'Z' sections in a manner similar to roof purlins.

Eave Strut

A cold-formed structural member at the eave to support roof and wall panels; also transmits forces due to wind on endwalls to roof brace rods to rod brace rods.

Downspout W/45 degree angle

A pipe to carry rainwater from a gutter to a drain or to ground level.

Corner Trim

Preformed color sheet metal trim used to close the junction of side and endwall sheets.

Sculptured Rake

The inclined edge of a sloped roof over a wall from the eave to the ridge.

Rake Angle

An angle attached to purlins at rake for attachment of end wall sheets.

Roll-Up Door

A door that opens by traveling vertically.

Door Jamb/Trim

The upper horizontal and two vertical frame members that house the door panel.

Peak Box

A piece of trim used to tie two pieces of rake trim that intersects at the peak of the building.

Ridge Cap

A material or covering applied over the ridge of a roof.

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Anchor Blot Plan - A plan view drawing showing the diameter and location of all anchor blots.

Base Angle - An angle secured to a foundation used to attach the bottom of wall paneling.

Beams & Column - A structural system consisting of a series of rafter beams supported by the columns.

Cee Channel - A piece of red metal in the shape of a "C" formed from steel coil. This is a very common piece.

Foam Closures - "Bird Blockers" A strip formed to the shape of the panel used to keep water, insects, birds, and rodents out from underneath the sheeting.

Framed Opening - Framing material and flashing that surround an opening.

Gable - The "A" framed portion of the end wall.

Main Frame - The collection of rafters and columns that support the secondary framing and transfer loads directly to the foundation.

Zee Channel - A piece of red metal commonly used that supports roof covering and carries the load weight to the main frame.

HELPFUL TIPS

When purchasing a metal building...

  • Make sure Anchor Bolts are included.
  • Make sure the wall and the roof sheets are 26 ga. metal with 20 year warranty.
  • Make sure your trim is 26 ga. metal w/ 20 year warranty.*
  • Make sure the freight and taxes are figured in the price.
  • Consider that other companies rarely figure overhead doors into the building price. They typically just figure the framed openings. Don't get caught here!
  • Consider that most other companies do not figure insulation.

*Some companies use 29 guage metal, which is inadequate and results in a wavy trim appearance.